The Texas Facilities Commission, which oversees the state’s real estate development, recently adopted Building Information Modeling for state design and construction projects.
Rice University’s BioScience Research Collaborative project in Houston utilized Linbeck’s “hypertrack” construction process and BIM to speed project delivery.
Photo: Linbeck
Rice University’s BioScience Research Collaborative project in Houston utilized Linbeck’s “hypertrack” construction process and BIM to speed project delivery.

For more than a year, the Facilities Design and Construction division within TFC has worked to standardize the use of BIM for its future projects.

The division’s goal in using BIM digital design technology is to promote workflow efficiency, streamline productivity and increase the return on investment for the state.

This digital design technology, in the form of coordinated, data-rich BIM models, gives TFC and its architectural and engineering design professionals the ability to explore early design concepts in 3D. Additionally, it allows them to visually analyze and simulate projects before construction begins while helping identify and reduce design conflicts. It also allows them to work in a more collaborative way.

After construction, BIM can be used throughout a building’s life to provide coordinated, consistent data among TFC’s design and construction partners.

The FDC developed guidelines and an interoperable BIM template for private-sector partners to access data prior to involvement in a state project.