Ground has broken on a $12 million redevelopment of WNYC Transmitter Park along the East River in Brooklyn. Construction on the project which includes a pier at the end of Kent Street consisting of a concrete platform connected by aluminum bridges, a park, and waterfront esplanade is expected to be completed in early 2012.

The $12 million Transmitter Park will include a pier, a water esplanade and a park and is scheduled to be completed by early 2012.
Rendering Courtesy Of NYCEDC
The $12 million Transmitter Park will include a pier, a water esplanade and a park and is scheduled to be completed by early 2012.
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“Across all five boroughs, we’re working to bring our waterfront back to life for recreational use by New Yorkers, and WNYC Transmitter Park will be the latest, but not the last, new park we’re bringing to Greenpoint,” said Parks & Recreation Commissioner Adrian Benepe who was joined by New York City Economic Development Corporation President Seth W. Pinsky at the groundbreaking ceremony.

The redevelopment of Transmitter Park is based on the 2005 Greenpoint-Williamsburg rezoning and also includes a new overlook, new seating, and a pedestrian bridge that will be built across an excavated historic ferry slip and restored as a wetland accessible to visitors.1.6-acres of open space will also be provided in the center of the park with a separate children’s play area.

NYCEDC is overseeing the construction of the park which was designed by EDAW of San Francisco, California and McLaren Engineering Group of West Nyack, New York as well as WXY Architecture + urban design of New York. The LiRO Group of Syosset, New York is acting as resident engineer and Phoenix Marine Co., Inc. of Sayreville, New Jersey is acting as contractor. Funding for the park includes $9.6 million in city capital funds, $500,000 from the New York City Council, $400,000 from Borough President Marty Markowitz, more than $1.1 million from a Federal Highway Administration issued grant, and $370,000 in grants from the New York State Environmental Protection Fund.